user stories

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Half a glass

Is this glass half empty or half full?

There’s normally more than one way to interpret a situation, but we often forget that the situation itself may be under our control.

I often find my clients have backed themselves into a corner by accepting an overly restrictive understanding of what they’re trying to achieve. They will tell me, for example, that this story is too big BUT that it can’t be split, because then it wouldn’t deliver value. Or, they might be saying that there’s no point writing unit tests BECAUSE the architecture doesn’t support it. Or even, it’s not worth fixing this flickering test, because it ALWAYS works when they run it locally.

I encourage them to rethink the situation. A slice through that story may not deliver the final solution the customer needs, but it will act as a small increment towards the solution. Minor refactorings are usually enough to make a section of the code independently testable. That flickering test is undermining any confidence there might be in the test suite – fix it or delete it.

Don’t try to put a spin on a half-full glass – rethink the glass.

Instead of asking if the glass is half-full or half-empty, use half a glass.

(It turns out that wittier minds than mine have already applied themselves to this proverb – here’s a bumper collection.)

By |December 15th, 2014|Agile, Musings, Practices|0 Comments

User Story Mapping

I’ve been reading Jeff Patton’s work online for years, learning from his ideas and approaches. You’ve probably come across his Mona Lisa analogy for iterative and incremental development – and if you haven’t this is a good time to go and read it 😉

Well, he has just released a book, User Story Mapping, and it is every bit as good as I would have hoped. If you don’t know what User Story Mapping is then this book will (obviously) tell you, but you will learn a whole lot more than that. I believe that this is THE missing agile book.

Throughout the book Jeff uses examples from his clients to demonstrate the simple techniques that he uses. ANd the most important ingredient, for me, is the emphasis on the need for rapid feedback and the need to SLICE USER STORIES THINLY. He’s not alone in this regard – JB Rainsberger calls it “Product Sashimi” and Alistair Cockburn calls is “Elephant Carpaccio”.

Go buy this book today. Don’t let it languish on your bookshelf – read it. And start putting the advice into practice as soon as you can.

By |November 17th, 2014|Agile, Practices|1 Comment