Systems

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Entanglement (or there’s nothing new under the sun)

I’ve just read The Age of Entanglement : When Quantum Physics was Reborn by Louisa Gilder. It’s a tremendous book, looking at the interplay between great physicists over the whole of the 20th century. If you want to learn about quantum physics itself, this is probably not the book for you, but if a mix of science and history is your thing, then I can’t recommend this book enough. But that’s not why I’m writing this post.

As I read the book, there were two passages that jumped out at me because they were so relevant to experiences I have regularly. One was about testing and the other was about collaboration. Maybe I shouldn’t have been surprised, but there you have it – I was.

Experimental physicists understand that testing saves time. They sound a lot like developers who:
“want to slap it all together, turn it on, and see what happens.”
Inevitably:
“you can almost guarantee it’s not going to work right.”
Doesn’t this sound familiar? Their conclusion might sound familiar too:
“People always think you don’t have the time to test everything. The truth is you don’t not have the time. It’s actually a time-saving way of doing it.”

And then I found the description of a conference that sounded like a pre-cursor to the modern, open space ‘unconferences’ that have been springing up. An explicit acknowledgement that:
“the best part of any conference is always the conversation over coffee or beer, the chance meeting in the hall, the argument over dinner.”
This led directly to their decision to:
“organise their conference to be nothing but these events. No prepared talks, no schedule, no proceedings.”
I’ve heard of regular, private get-togethers like this that go on in the software community, where a selected group of invitees hole up […]

By |February 19th, 2015|Musings, Practices, Systems, Unit testing|0 Comments

Continuous delivery – the novel

I find myself recommending the same books over and over again. When speaking to techies I invariably recommend GOOS; when speaking to managers The Mythical Man Month or Waltzing With Bears. Over the past year or two, I’ve also pointed a lot of organisations at Continuous Delivery by Jez Humble and Dave Farley. It’s an important book, but I think it could have been shorter, and that’s an important consideration for the target audience. If you consider the other books I recommend that weigh in at 384, 336 and 196 pages respectively, Continuous Delivery extends to 512 and it feels longer. That’s not because it isn’t good – it is – but because it is detailed and quite dense.

Last week I finally heeded Liz Keogh’s advice and read The Phoenix Project (“a novel about IT, Devops and helping your business win”). In terms of prose style, it doesn’t compete with Liz’s own efforts, but it is very readable and does a great job of getting some quite tricky concepts across (Lean, Theory of Constraints, The Three Ways). The authors acknowledge their debt to Goldratt’s The Goal, and indeed they are ploughing the same furrow, but in the field of software. Amazon says the print copy is 343 pages long, but I read it on the Kindle and it felt shorter than that.

The reason I’m adding this book to my recommended list isn’t just because it’s short and readable. It’s because it makes some very frightening concepts very easy to digest. I didn’t know how to explain quite why I liked it so much until I found myself reading a Venkat Rao post this morning, where he describes how we change our minds:

You have to:

1. Learn new […]

By |February 24th, 2014|Agile, Practices, Systems|1 Comment