Monthly Archives: March 2015

//March

Making a meal of architectural alignment and the test-induced-design-damage fallacy

Starter
A few days ago Simon Brown posted a thoughtful piece called “Package by component and architecturally-aligned testing.” The first part of the post discusses the tensions between the common packaging approaches package-by-layer and package-by-feature. His conclusion, that neither is the right answer, is supported by a quote from Jason Gorman (that expresses the essence of thought over dogma):
The real skill is finding the right balance, and creating packages that make stuff easier to find but are as cohesive and loosely coupled as you can make them at the same time
Simon then introduces an approach that he calls package-by-component, where he describes a component as:
a combination of the business and data access logic related to a specific thing (e.g. domain concept, bounded context, etc)
By giving every component a public interface and package-protected implementation, any feature that needs to access data related to that component is forced to go through the public interface of the component that ‘owns’ the data. No direct access to the data access layer is allowed. This is a huge improvement over the frequent spaghetti-and-meatball approach to encapsulation of the data layer. I like this architectural approach. It makes things simpler and safer. But Simon draws another implication from it:
how we mock-out the data access code to create quick-running “unit tests”? The short answer is don’t bother, unless you really need to.
I tweeted that I couldn’t agree with this, and Simon responded:
This is a topic that polarises people and I’m still not sure why
Main course
I’m going to invoke the rule of 3 to try and lay out why I disagree with Simon.
Fast feedback
The main benefit of automated tests is that you get feedback quickly when something has gone wrong. The longer it takes to run the tests, the longer […]

By |March 19th, 2015|Agile, Practices|2 Comments