Monthly Archives: January 2014

//January

Eat your own dogma food

The software development community experiences fad after fad. Consultants and thought leaders dream up new methodologies; old practices are relabelled and promoted as the next big thing; flame wars are fought over names, tabs and brace position.

One of the few practices that has stood the test of time is that of “eating your own dog food”, which essentially means that you’ll be the first user of any software that you’re developing. In more polite (and optimistic) circles this is also known as “drinking your own champagne”. When it comes to development practices, I think we need to adopt the same approach.

If you’re going to make dogmatic statements about how software should be developed, then you as a developer should be prepared to stick to them yourself. No more  “do as I say, not as I do”. It’s time to eat your own dogma food.

By |January 14th, 2014|Agile, Practices|0 Comments

TDD at interviews

Allan Kelly posted an article on DZone this week predicting that TDD would be a required skill for developers by 2022. Vishal Biyani asked on Twitter about how one might test TDD skills, and I promised to blog about my experience of using Cyber-Dojo in interview situations.

Cyber-Dojo is a browser-based dojo environment developed by Jon Jagger that supports a lot of programming languages and xDD frameworks. It’s great for dojos because it has few of the productivity frills that we’ve come to depend on over the years – no syntax highlighting; no autocompletion; no suggested fixes. That means we have to think about what we’re doing, rather than relying on muscle memory.

As Jon eloquently puts it in the FAQ: “Listen. Stop trying to go faster, start trying to go slower. Don’t think about finishing, think about improving. Think about practising as a team. That’s what cyber-dojo is built for.”

That might be what cyber-dojo was built for, but it turns out that it’s also excellent as an interview environment. Your interviewee writes real code and has to diagnose with real compiler/runtime errors. They’ll have to use a browser to remind themselves of all the basic knowledge that has atrophied during years of nanny-IDE development. And, best of all, there’s no save, build or run functionality provided by cyber-dojo. There’s only a single button and it’s labelled nice and clear: TEST.

Use one of the katas whose instructions have been helpfully included with cyber-dojo, or roll one of your own, and see how your interviewee responds. Every time they press the TEST button, all the code they’ve written is sent over to the server to be built & run and the response is returned, along with a traffic light: green for “all tests passed”, red for […]

By |January 11th, 2014|Practices, TDD, Unit testing|1 Comment

When is a tester not a tester?

No, I’m not trawling through my xmas cracker jokes. I was looking through the programme for DevWeek 2014 and both my sessions are tagged as “Test”. This is following a pattern started at ScanDev last year and followed by several other conferences at home and abroad.

Why am I bothered? It’s not that I mind being associated with testing at all. I don’t think of testers as a lower form of life. I *love* testers. It’s for the same reason that Dan North and Chris Matts started using the “should” word instead of the “test” word all those years ago – developers think that the test track is not for them.

Both my sessions at DevWeek are about types of testing that developers should be doing routinely. “So long, and thanks for all the tests” explores what makes a test valuable and what practices developers should consider adopting. “Mutation testing – better code by making bugs” is an alternative to code meaningless coverage metrics that can help developers ensure they’re sticking to their definition of done.

Q. When is a tester not a tester?
A. When they’re a developer.

You’re right. It’s not funny. So, it’s ideal for a cracker.

By |January 9th, 2014|Practices, Unit testing|0 Comments