Monthly Archives: December 2013

//December

Aslak’s view of BDD, Cucumber and automated testing

This is a quote from Aslak Hellesoy on the Cukes Google group.

“Even on this list, the majority of people seem to think that Cucumber == Automated Tests == BDD, which is WRONG.

What people need to understand is:

Cucumber is a tool for BDD
Cucumber is a tool for Specification By Example
Specification By Example is just a better name for BDD
Specification By Example / BDD means examples (Scenarios) are written *before* implementation
Specification By Example should happen iteratively, in collaboration with non-technical stakeholders
Automated Tests are a by-product of Specification By Example
Writing Automated Tests does *not* imply you’re doing Specification By Example
Using Cucumber for Automated Tests without doing Specification By Example is stupid
Cucumber is not a tool for Automated Testing, it’s a tool for Collaborative, Executable Specifications”

Aslak Hellesoy    – 12th December 2013
Cukes Google Group
https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/cukes/XFB7CjWuI14

By |December 14th, 2013|Agile, Cucumber|0 Comments

The context and definition challenge

We’re very good at rationalising. Almost any statement can be justified by the retroactive application of the twin constraints of “context” and “definition.”

As an example, Chris Matts (@papachrismatts) talked about the “death of Agile” in a recent blog post of his, and I took issue with that. We talked about it briefly at a couple of conferences and he explained why it made sense to him:

– context: “Agile” as a set of recipes, not values (c.f. Scrum, SAFe, DAD and accompanying certifications)
– definition: “Dead” means devalued through repeatedly over-promising and under-delivering

I still don’t think that agile has died, and neither does Chris in the general sense, but given the specific circumstances of his post the statement makes sense. But it took me time and effort to gain that understanding – time and effort that someone looking for a reference to support their view might not invest.

Neil Killick (@neil_killick) makes a good point that we often use controversy to stimulate debate, so should we care that our words can be misinterpreted, or quoted out of context? I think the answer is sometimes. Influential members of any community should consider carefully how the constituency that they are addressing might (mis)interpret their statements. No matter how much you may hope that people will think for themselves, the pronouncements of “thought leaders” carry a weight that cannot be ignored.

Misinterpretation of the written word is all too common, however. The “Three Amigos” meeting at the heart of Behaviour Driven Development (BDD) emphasises the need to have frequent, open, high bandwidth collaboration between technical and non-technical participants for just this reason. The differing perspectives of the participants challenge the implicit assumptions of the others.

If you make strong assertions in your tweets, […]

By |December 3rd, 2013|Agile, doa|0 Comments