Monthly Archives: October 2013

//October

Tax or investment – which do you prefer?

I was working with a client last week who were trying to fit some new technical practices into their daily routine. The way they were trying to ‘account’ for this in their iteration planning was by introducing a 10% ‘tax’ on their velocity. In other words, they were reducing the number of story points that they would accept into the iteration to make up for the time spent getting better at TDD (for example).

Quite apart from whether you think this is a good way to go about it (I don’t) there’s a real issue of terminology. Maybe taxes are levied for the good of the nation, but very few people feel ecstatic about paying them. Taxes ensure you keep getting what you already take for granted.

This team was trying to improve their work, so that they could deliver better value. By calling this a tax I think they were setting the wrong tone for discussions with their customers and management. Far better to describe it, accurately, as an investment. An investment in the staff, the organisation and the product. An investment that would produce returns.

Phil Karlton famously said: “There are only two hard things in Computer Science: cache invalidation and naming things.” It turns out it’s not just in computer science that it’s hard. Who knew?

Do you have any great examples of poorly chosen names, that give people the wrong impression of something?

By |October 24th, 2013|Agile|1 Comment

Value by association

Do you care what label is on your shirt? Or your car? Or your laptop? I bet you do, but why? Is there something substantive underneath the fashion-victim facade or is it just some sort of post-modern tribalism?

A few of us have been debating the death (or otherwise) of agile, and it seems to come down to whether the agile brand has become devalued. I’d like to move the discussion back a decade or so and ask whether there was ever any value to the brand – value to the customer that is. (After all one of the principles in the manifesto states that “Our highest priority is to satisfy the customer.”)

I don’t believe that a customer derives any value from a consultant simply because they are ‘agile.’ I don’t believe in ‘value by association.’ I don’t trust brands.

If you want a plumber or lawyer do you seriously just look through the Yellow Pages (or contemporary equivalent)? Really? Don’t you ask friends and family for recommendations first? And if their recommendations are all busy won’t you look for referrals or reviews or some “independent” verification of someone’s suitability for taking your money?

I don’t even think a personal recommendation is enough. Competence needs to be qualified. A family lawyer is not necessarily the right person to use in a patent law suit. Someone who has successfully deployed agile in a small organisation is not qualified to deploy agile at the portfolio level in a multinational (thanks @tastapod).

As well as ‘competence’, we should take into account ‘attitude’ when we choose who to work with. I use ‘competence’ in the sense that someone has the knowledge, skill and experience requisite to perform the task that I need done. […]

By |October 4th, 2013|doa, Uncategorized|0 Comments